Is Sizemore the Right Answer?

Fresh off a Patriots loss to the Giants that was eerily similar to Super Bowl 42, I sit down at my lap top tonight to write about the Boston Red Sox.  While the NBA is in the midst of a lockout that could very well cancel the entire 2011-2012 NBA season and prematurely end the window of opportunity for the Boston Celtics to win a title, I can only think about the Boston Red Sox.  With the Bruins drinking coffee, taking a cold shower, pumping their bodies with Vitamin C, and doing everything possible to cure their Stanley Cup hangover, I am focused on the Boston Red Sox off-season.

It’s no secret that the Red Sox are my passion.  I could write about my Texas Longhorns with their two-headed freshman quarterback and how I don’t see a national title in their future any time soon.  I could write about the commencement of Ed Cooley’s tenure at Providence College and his quest to bring the program back to some sort of respectability.  If any of my colleagues want to get back on the blog, they are more than welcome. I just rather write about the Sox.

With all that being said, it is rumor season, also known as hot stove season in baseball.  Anyone who knows me knows I love finding all the rumors and throwing them out there in the course of casual conversation.  There has been plenty of speculation about who the next Red Sox manager is going to be.  To be honest, that conversation bores me.  I am more fascinated with player movement, which at last brings me to the point of this post.

On October 31, 2o11 the Cleveland Indians declined their option to bring back Grady Sizemore.  Sizemore was once the face of the franchise, perennial All-Star, and the reason for a fan club known as Grady’s Lady’s.  The injury bug has stricken Sizemore over the past 2 seasons as he has only played 104 games since 2009.  Back in 2006 and 2007 Sizemore was one of the best outfielder’s in the game, leading the league in runs and doubles in 2006.

JD Drew has finally played out his contract leaving an opening in right field for the Sox.  The in-house replacements are Ryan Kalish and Josh Reddick.  Kalish is coming off a year in which he was hurt for the majority of the season with a shoulder issue and never saw time with the big club in 2011 after a nice showing in 2010.  Reddick started his 2011 season in great fashion hitting as high as .348 but then came crashing down to earth at the plate and showed he was a defensive liability.

When I first heard the rumors of the Red Sox interest in Sizemore I was pessimistic.  Signing Sizemore now is a lot like Lindsay Lohan posing in Playboy now.  It would have been awesome 5-6 years ago.  They are both damaged goods and way past their prime.  Lohan is clearly using Playboy as a way to gain some publicity hoping to revive her “career.”

If the Red Sox were to sign Sizemore, it would be much like their signing of Adrian Beltre in 2009.  They would offer him a 1 year
deal worth about $8 million and call it a low risk high reward type deal.  It worked with Beltre back in 2009 as he led the league in doubles with 49, hit .321 with 28 home runs and 102 runs batted in.  He played 154 games proving his durability.  That one year was a perfect audition for the rest of Major League Baseball.  The Rangers went on to sign him to a 6 year $96 million deal.  It proved to be a win-win for Beltre and the Red Sox.

If Ben Cherington and the rest of the Red Sox brass feel that Kalish and/or Reddick aren’t ready to be an everyday player in right field they can turn to Sizemore and offer him a Beltre-esque deal.  Ultimately, I would not be upset if that were to happen.  I loved Sizemore back in 2006 much like I loved Lohan.  An outfield of Crawford, Ellsbury, and a healthy Sizemore would be unbelievable. I see no reason why the Red Sox can’t offer him a one year deal.  My only reservation is the amount of pink hats would most likely double and there would be a Grady’s Lady’s section followed by an Ells’ Belle’s section at Fenway Park.

Follow me on Twitter @ScottieNTCF

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